Tabouleh Salad

There is nothing like buying a little bit of fresh herbs to give humph and a clean flavor to a dish. Sometimes all you need is a couple of tablespoons. And then you are left with a bunch of herbs without planned use. In comes the bunch of parsley I purchased for the Tyrolean Knodel I made again last week. I only needed a little and I had so much left.

I often freeze my fresh herbs but they tend to be left forgotten. Parsley is not a herb I use a lot so I wanted to make something different while still fresh. There is only one recipe that I know of that requires parsley in large quantity, the Tabouleh Salad.

tabouleh 036

I would have to say Tabouleh is probably one of the first Middle Eastern foods I have ever eaten, it acompanied a Lebanese fast food dish. Tabouleh claims its origins in Syria and Lebanon but it became quickly popular all over the Middle East, each country putting a twist on it.

tabouleh 042

I have consumed countless Tabouleh versions since my first one.  Some were an eye opener and many were a huge disappointment. I believe this recipe below is the best Tabouleh I have ever tasted. I really like the texture of the Israeli couscous in here, a nice variation but a similar size on the traditional bulgur. The seasoning is so simple but full of taste. The parsley is not overbearing in this recipe either. I highly recommend you give this one a try.

tabouleh 021

I have you seen these nifty herb scissors? I got them for Christmas after I exclaimed jealousy to my mom who had gotten a pair as a hostess gift a couple of year’s back. Five blades easily chop up fresh herbs without bruising the leaves too much. A little plastic comb gets the herbs in the blades out. It’s my new favorite gadget.


Tabouleh Salad

Recipe Type: Salads & Soups
Cuisine: Middle Eastern
Prep time:
Cook time:
Total time:
  • 1 bunch of fresh parsley stems removed, chopped
  • 2 tablespoons of fresh mint, chopped
  • 1/2 medium onion, finely chopped
  • a handful of cherry tomatoes, quartered
  • 1/2 tablespoon salt
  • 1/4 teaspoon black pepper
  • 1/2 cup dry Israeli cousous, cooked
  • 3 tablespoons lemon juice
  • 3 tablespoons extra virgin olive oil
  1. Combine all ingredients and mix well.
  2. Serve immediately or chill in refrigerator for 2 hours before serving.
Feel free to substitute the Israeli couscous with a regular couscous or the traditional bulgur.


Share on Yummly0

Israeli Couscous With Spinach, Feta and Walnuts

Every once in a while you discover an ingredient you just cannot get enough of. My current fetish ingredient is Israeli couscous. I L-O-V-E the stuff. I first discovered it in a farmer’s market in Toronto. On a following trip I went back to buy some more…I have yet to find some in Montreal. I just may have to order some online.

I wanted to make a casserole like dish with Israeli couscous for a dinner with a friend. Now this friend is not vegetarian but she is 100% all about sustainability and organic food…particularly meat. I applaud her effort but I won’t pay 12$ for 2 chicken breasts. Perhaps I just don,t know where to go shop for organic meat. Anyways, when she comes over I always do a vegetarian dish. This one if loaded with CHEESE!

She is also a foodie so my goal was to blow her mind, or should I say her taste buds. This recipe was absolutely astounding and amazing. It is full of intense flavors, especially garlic. We both had seconds.


Ξ Israeli Couscous With Spinach, Feta and Walnuts Ξ
adapted from KLHquilts on

1 1/2 cup Israeli couscous
2 cups boiling water
1/2 teaspoon salt
2 tablespoons olive oil
4 garlic cloves, minced
1 large onion, diced
1 (28 ounce) can diced tomatoes
1/2 cup minced fresh basil
1 cup feta, cubed
1/3 cup walnuts
5 cups loosely packed fresh spinach
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1 cup grated Harvarti (or Gouda, Monterey Jack, Provologne)

Add couscous and salt to boiling water. Cover and let sit 10-15 minutes, then fluff with fork.

Heat oil in large skillet. Saute garlic and onion until tender and translucent.

Drain canned tomatoes, reserving 2/3 cup juice. Add drained tomatoes to garlic and onions. Cook until most of the liquid has evaporated, about 10 minutes, stirring frequently.

Stir tomato mixture into couscous. Mix in half the reserved tomato juice, basil, feta, walnuts, 4 cups of the spinach, salt and pepper.

Spread half of the couscous mixture in a square baking dish. Sprinkle half the Havarti evenly, then top with remaining couscous mixture.

Spread evenly on top the cup of spinach left, pour remaining tomato juice over and sprinkle remaining Havarti.

Bake for 25 minutes in a preheated oven at 375 F.

Share on Yummly0